DOCS SPEAK OUT

0

EQUIPMENT PURCHASES

With Vision Expo West and the American Academy of Optometry meeting behind, you’ve no doubt been hearing about and seeing the latest advances in ophthalmic technology. At the same time, you might be doing your year-end tax planning. One consideration, for example: The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 expanded Section 179 of the tax code, allowing you to deduct the full purchase price of qualifying equipment and software. In this month’s “Docs Speak Out” survey, we ask ODs about their equipment purchasing decisions.

IF YOU COULD BUY/RECEIVE ANY ONE PIECE OF EQUIPMENT, WHAT WOULD IT BE AND WHY?
“OCT. It gives the most objective clinically useful information for disease diagnosis, monitoring and treatment.”

“Anterior segment camera. I see so many eyelid and anterior segment lesions that would be great to quickly document and monitor. Pictures are always better than my drawings or descriptions.”

“YAG laser.”

“Edger. Just don’t understand why they cost so much.”

“OCT with angiography technology. Cutting edge. Better for treating AMD and diabetic changes in retina.”

“I am already upgrading my OCT, so in addition, I would purchase a digital phoroptor.”

“Vision therapy technology because we have VT/Rehab practice.”

“Digital refactor. Speed and accuracy.”

“OCT because of technological advances in diagnostic ability. Too expensive, though.”

“Computerized/digital refraction system. To have the latest in state-of-the-art equipment.”

“Combo auto-K-ref that does some meibomian gland imaging. Need the K’s and refraction info. Would appreciate the gland images.”

“Camera (anterior and posterior) to better follow conditions and discuss with patients about their conditions.”

“Automated lensometer to speed up pretesting.”

“Optos. Need a good accessible imaging device for primary care and diabetic imaging.”

“Autorefractor. Never had one and never used it yet. But I have every other equipment except that and the Optos. I have two fundus cameras, including the Eidon, which has better resolution than the Optos but small field.”

“Have all I want for now.”

WHAT ARE THE TWO MOST IMPORTANT FACTORS IN YOUR DECISION TO PURCHASE A PARTICULAR PIECE OF EQUIPMENT?
“Is it beneficial to the patient? Is it beneficial to the practice?”

“Cost and reimbursement.”

“ROI and tax advantages.”

“Quality and reliability. Ability to generate results or capital.”

“Cost and ability to bill for.”

“Can it provide more information or can it do something better than what I currently have?”

“How does it improve patient care? What is cost/benefit ratio? Can I pay for it in a reasonable time with patient fees?”

“Reliability and ease of use.”

“Price. Quality.”

“Cost/benefit. Do I have enough cash to pay for it?”

“Practice need for delivering patient care is primary. Disease state detection and monitoring.”

“Will it help me provide better care to my patients? Will it pay for itself, either in additional reimbursements or improved efficiency?”

“Quality equipment: Useful in diagnosis, appealing aesthetically to patients with high-tech appearance, value to practice and, of course, ease of use requiring minimal staff time or learning process and durability. I like things to last at least five years or more.”

Share.

Leave A Reply