DOCS SPEAK OUT – FEBRUARY 2019

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OCULAR TRAUMA

Many eye injuries happen to adults on the job, however, nearly half (44%) happen in the home, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. In our “Docs Speak Out” survey this month, we asked optometrists about the ocular trauma injuries they commonly see in their practice, how often, where they happen and who they happen to.

What are the most common eye injuries you’ve treated in your practice? Can you share any extraordinary cases you’ve seen?
“Metallic foreign body and corneal abrasions are the most common. Two strangest incidents were a tick (alive) attached to bulbar conjunctiva and a spider (deceased) under upper lid of another patient.”

“Scratched in the eye with yard debris while doing yard work.”

“Nail gun, chemicals, cleaning fluids, glue (from false eyelashes), a fist.”

“Most common, with often poor outcomes, are the use of bungee cords or other elastic property (heavy key chain) that release back unexpectedly for blunt or lacerating results.”

“Sports—mostly basketball. Also, babies’ fingers into parents’ eyes, fist to eye, chemical splash, welders with slag and mechanics with rust. These are common.”

“Corneal/conjunctival foreign bodies are the most common. We also see globe laceration, orbital fractures.”

“Foreign bodies from grinder injuries. Walking into objects like trees or cabinet doors. Using hydrogen peroxide cleaner improperly.”

“Our most common injury is small metallic corneal foreign bodies.”

“Welding mishaps are most common.”

“Foreign body lodged in cornea from workplace safety mishap.”

“Most common are corneal abrasions following a sports incident or the occasional Nerf gun.”

“Foreign bodies due to not wearing safety glasses.”

“Puncture wound while hunting.”

“Sports-related blunt trauma.”

“We are open Saturdays so we do a lot of metal foreign body removals.”

“We see a lot of metallic foreign bodies from both workplace and home. Also, a good amount of eyes being poked by a branch, another person, or even a pet.”

“Corneal or conjunctival foreign body/corneal abrasion.”

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